Search Menu
Photonics Media Photonics Buyers' Guide Photonics EDU Photonics Spectra BioPhotonics EuroPhotonics Industrial Photonics Photonics Showcase Photonics ProdSpec Photonics Handbook
More News
Email Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Comments

  • News Briefs (Jan. 9, 2006)
Jan 2006
Janos Technology Inc., a Keene, N.H.-based maker of infrared (IR) optical lenses and assemblies and advanced IR optics, has named Harvey Clough as its president. Before joining Janos, Clough was president and COO of Energy Sciences Inc., a machinery manufacturer in Wilmington, Mass. He previously worked in manufacturing, quality and engineering management at GE Lighting. . . . Guy Horrigan has joined the sales team at displayLED, a London-based maker of giant video screens, electronic displays and scoreboards. Horrigan was formerly in sales at Lighthouse Technologies, where he developed audiovisual markets in the UK and Europe. . . . Goodrich Corp., a Charlotte, N.C., supplier of systems and services to the aerospace and defense industry, was awarded a contract from the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate to develop and deliver an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) detector array for use in high-definition (1920x1080 pixel) shortwave infrared (SWIR) night-vision cameras. The contract will further the development of high-resolution, small pixel pitch, high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength cameras that can simultaneously produce images in both the visible and the SWIR wavelength regions, the company said. The project will be conducted by the Goodrich's Optical and Space Systems team (formerly Sensors Unlimited) in Princeton, N.J. Goodrich said it will design an improved readout integrated circuit architecture with a 12-m pixel pitch, allowing for a tiny array with high resolution by minimizing the weight and size of the optical assembly for long-range imaging. Work will also focus on improving the visible response from the current indium phosphide (InP) substrate removal process. The new ROIC and the improved photodiodes will be integrated into the night-vision camera, which will have the potential for applications in areas such as covert surveillance, optical coherence tomography, hot end-process inspection (e.g., glass and steel), spectroscopy and a variety of other machine-vision tasks.

Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy About Us Contact Us
back to top

Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS
©2016 Photonics Media
x We deliver – right to your inbox. Subscribe FREE to our newsletters.