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Medical Imaging:

Photonics Spectra
Aug 1998
Economics Drives New Equipment Purchases

Richard Gaughan, Contributing Editor, and Robert Pini, News Editor

Medical imaging facilities around the world are gradually transforming themselves, becoming more and more alike as a result of the growing globalization of technology markets. As a result, and despite the range of diagnostic imaging technologies, a hospital in Europe or Japan is likely to use the same or similar equipment as a hospital of similar size and resources in the US.
Novel imaging technologies are allowing unprecedented laboratory efficiency, instant consultations and the ability to identify and diagnose patient conditions extremely rapidly. From Germany to Japan and Argentina to Australia, a technological advance in imaging can be transferred to diagnostic labs around the world soon after it is developed.
That is how it works in theory. But even when the technology advances the state of patient care, the market for diagnostic imaging remains predominantly cost-driven. Medical imaging facilities around the world are gradually transforming themselves, becoming more and more alike as a result of the growing globalization of technology markets. As a result, and despite the range of diagnostic imaging technologies, a hospital in Europe or Japan is likely to use the same or similar equipment as a hospital of similar size and resources in the US.
Novel imaging technologies are allowing unprecedented laboratory efficiency, instant consultations and the ability to identify and diagnose patient conditions extremely rapidly. From Germany to Japan and Argentina to Australia, a technological advance in imaging can be transferred to diagnostic labs around the world soon after it is developed.
That is how it works in theory. But even when the technology advances the state of patient care, the market for diagnostic imaging remains predominantly cost-driven. Medical imaging facilities around the world are gradually transforming themselves, becoming more and more alike as a result of the growing globalization of technology markets. As a result, and despite the range of diagnostic imaging technologies, a hospital in Europe or Japan is likely to use the same or similar equipment as a hospital of similar size and resources in the US.
Novel imaging technologies are allowing unprecedented laboratory efficiency, instant consultations and the ability to identify and diagnose patient conditions extremely rapidly. From Germany to Japan and Argentina to Australia, a technological advance in imaging can be transferred to diagnostic labs around the world soon after it is developed.
That is how it works in theory. But even when the technology advances the state of patient care, the market for diagnostic imaging remains predominantly cost-driven.


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