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Cambridge NanoTech Partners with Stanford

Photonics.com
Jun 2010
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., June 21, 2010 — Atomic layer deposition (ALD) science and equipment provider Cambridge NanoTech announced Tuesday its partnership with Stanford University’s Center for Integrated Systems (CIS) to perform research on semiconductor and advanced electronics.

The university is now outfitted with five of the company’s ALD systems, including three of its Savannah thermal systems and, most recently, a Fiji F202 dual-chamber plasma system. The latest Savannah and Fiji systems are being used at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF) to produce ultrathin nanomechanical switches.

Additionally, the Savannah has been used to explore materials with electrical properties and low surface energies, including titanium nitride and tungsten. 

One chamber of the Fiji system will be used to grow oxide and nitride films, and the second chamber will be available for more exotic possibilities, like gold, nanotubes and graphene.

As one of the 14 National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN) sites, the SNF offers support in nanoscale fabrication, synthesis, characterization, modeling, design, computation and training in an open, hands-on environment for all qualified users. The company has ALD tools installed in nearly half of all NNIN sites.

For more information, visit:  www.cambridgenanotech.com 



GLOSSARY
electronics
That branch of science involved in the study and utilization of the motion, emissions and behaviors of currents of electrical energy flowing through gases, vacuums, semiconductors and conductors, not to be confused with electrics, which deals primarily with the conduction of large currents of electricity through metals.
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