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  • Synopsys Acquires Optical Research Associates
Oct 2010
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Oct. 7 — Electronic design automation provider Synopsys Inc. announced Thursday that it has extended its engineering software capability into optical design and analysis by acquiring privately held Optical Research Associates (ORA) of Pasadena, Calif., for an undisclosed amount.

ORA software is used to design and optimize applications that require light to be controlled or manipulated. It allows engineers to design and optimize the optical components and systems found in products such as cameras, telescopes, semiconductor lithography equipment, projectors, laptop displays, automotive lighting, and solid-state lighting using LEDs. Optical components can include items such as lenses, prisms and mirrors, while the systems can include any combination of components necessary to achieve the desired image or image uniformity.

Acquiring ORA allows Synopsys, which is based in Mountainview, to move into the rapidly growing markets associated with displays and solid-state lighting using LEDs, as well as expand into markets such as semiconductor lithography equipment and cameras, Synopsys said.

"Optical design is a logical adjacency for Synopsys," said Howard Ko, senior vice president and general manager of Synopsys' silicon engineering group. "We believe that together we can provide substantial value to ORA's current customers as well as to growing and emerging markets in solid-state lighting and LEDs."

ORA was founded in 1963 and also has offices in Tucson, Ariz., and Westborough, Mass.

The terms of the deal, which closed today, were not disclosed. The acquisition is not expected to be material to Synopsys's results in either fiscal 2010 or 2011.

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Electromagnetic radiation detectable by the eye, ranging in wavelength from about 400 to 750 nm. In photonic applications light can be considered to cover the nonvisible portion of the spectrum which includes the ultraviolet and the infrared.
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