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  • FEI Wins Multi-System Order From CANMET

Photonics.com
Jan 2011
HILLSBORO, Ore., Jan. 12, 2011 — CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory (CANMET-MTL) has selected three of FEI Co.’s electron microscope systems for its new facility at the McMaster Innovation Park in Hamilton, Ontario.

CANMET-MTL, a research center funded by the Canadian government, has purchased FEI’s Tecnai Osiris scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM), the Helios NanoLab DualBeam, and the Nova NanoSEM ultrahigh resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM).


The Tecani Osiris S/TEM from FEI Co. reduces time for field-of-view elemental mapping from hours to minutes. (Photo: FEI)

The S/TEM combines analytical throughput with ease-of-use for high-volume, multi-user research facilities. Featuring the company’s ChemiSTEM technology, it reduces the time for field-of-view elemental mapping from hours to minutes.

Integrating the company’s high-resolution scanning electron microscope with its high-performance focused ion beam, the Helios NanoLab DualBeam delivers unprecedented levels of imaging and milling capabilities, the company said. It is suitable for research centers that need to perform advanced material characterization and modification down to the single nanometer scale.

The Nova NanoSEM can provide nanometer-scale resolution and ultraprecise analysis on a range of samples. In addition, it can examine highly insulating samples in low vacuum, with up to nearly the same resolution that can be achieved in high vacuum and with little or no preparation, eliminating artifacts and saving time.

The three systems will be shipped the CANMET-MTL during the first quarter of 2011.

For more information, visit: www.fei.com 



GLOSSARY
milling
An automatic surface-generating process involving the removal of a material from a given surface. Optical milling typically involves the abrasion of glass by a diamond-charged wheel.
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