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US Demand for Chemical Sensors Grows

Photonics.com
Feb 2011
CLEVELAND, Feb. 10, 2011 — US demand for chemical sensors is projected to grow 8.9 percent per year to $6.1 billion in 2014. Biosensors will continue to be the largest type of chemical sensor, as the increasing number of diagnosed diabetics boosts demand for glucose test strips. Overall growth will be supported by recovery in automobile manufacturing and process industries; by technological advances that allow for price reduction and greater precision, which will expand the use of chemical sensors into new markets and by new applications within existing markets. Demand for chemical sensors based on emerging technologies, such as optical sensors, will see fast gains. Although the largest end use will remain the medical market, growth will be strong in all chemical sensor outlets, which also include industrial and environmental monitoring applications. These and other trends are presented in “Chemical Sensors,” a new study from The Freedonia Group Inc.

Through 2014, electrochemical sensors are expected to see the fastest growth, with demand reflecting recovery in manufacturing – particularly new motor vehicle production – following the significant downturn beginning in late 2007. Optical sensors, including products based on IR, fiber optic, photoionization, fluorescence, chemiluminescence, LED, laser and UV technologies, also will see substantial gains. Optical sensors will continue to benefit from their high sensitivity, stability, immunity to interference, and product improvements such as smaller size and enhanced ruggedness. Biosensors are expected to provide good opportunities as well. Sales will be boosted by the increasing prevalence of diabetes in the population and by growing demand for home and point-of-care testing and monitoring tools.

The large automotive sensor market will post favorable growth due to a rebound in motor vehicle production. In addition, the development of lower-cost, more durable and higher-performance chemical sensors will drive demand in other markets such as process industries, water and wastewater monitoring, and homeland security. Demand in the process industries also will benefit from increasing regulation of food quality prior to distribution. In the medical market, demand for blood glucose test strips will reach $3.9 billion in 2014. Fierce competition among suppliers will put downward pressure on prices as manufacturers strive to capture or maintain market share.

“Chemical Sensors,” which was published in January, is available for $4800 from The Freedonia Group Inc.

For more information, visit:  www.freedoniagroup.com 

US Chemical Sensor Demand

(Millions of US$)

% Annual Growth

 

2004

2009

2014

2004-2009

2009-2014

Item

 

 

 

 

 

Chemical Sensor Demand

2903

3990

6115

6.6

8.9

Biosensors

1855

2950

4410

9.7

8.4

Electrochemical Sensors

825

730

1210

–2.4

10.6

Optical Sensors

120

165

260

6.6

9.5

Other

103

145

235

7.1

10.1

 

 

 

 

 

 




GLOSSARY
chemiluminescence
A chemical reaction involving the production of light. The reaction of ethylene with ozone is chemiluminescent.
fluorescence
The emission of light or other electromagnetic radiation of longer wavelengths by a substance as a result of the absorption of some other radiation of shorter wavelengths, provided the emission continues only as long as the stimulus producing it is maintained. In other words, fluorescence is the luminescence that persists for less than about 10-8 s after excitation.
photoionization
The ionization that occurs in gas affected by the action of radiation quanta.
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