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Lyncean Sells Its First Compact Light Source

PALO ALTO, Calif., Dec. 17, 2012 — Lyncean Technologies Inc. has sold its first compact light source (CLS) to the newly formed Center for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA) in Munich for biomedical imaging research.

The CLS miniature synchrotron x-ray source employs laser- and electron-beam technology and is expected to meet the growing demand of life science users who rely on synchrotrons for structural biology research.


Professors Ferenc Krausz (LMU/MPQ), Ronald Ruth (SLAC/Lyncean) and Franz Pfeiffer (TUM) celebrate after signing the purchase contract for a Lyncean compact light source, which was bought by researchers from the newly formed Center for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA) in Germany. CALA is a joint project of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and the Technical University of Munich. The device will be fully built and tested in Lyncean’s Palo Alto facility and delivered to Munich in early 2014. Courtesy of Franz Pfeiffer of TUM.

“The field of x-ray imaging is evolving rapidly, and with this novel source, we are adding a powerful tool to our facility,” said Dr. Franz Pfeiffer, the chair of biomedical physics at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). He expects that the CLS will significantly boost the research projects of the Munich Center for Advanced Photonics cluster.

Lyncean has collaborated informally with Pfeiffer’s group since 2007, experimenting with a CLS prototype. The light source has been used in a variety of medical research, including studies on improved tumor detection and early diagnosis of lung disease.

“Because the CLS is a new breed of x-ray source, with unique properties, we work with x-ray scientists to understand their applications,” said Dr. Ronald Ruth, Lyncean’s founder and chairman of the board. “The TUM collaboration is a good example of how we can successfully adapt our source for a particular application, in this case biomedical imaging.”

CALA is a joint project of TUM and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU).

The device will be fully built and tested at Lyncean’s Palo Alto facility, and will be delivered to Munich in early 2014.

For more information, visit: www.lynceantech.com



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