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  • Xenon Adds 3 Labs to Printed Electronics Test Network
Jun 2013
WILMINGTON, Mass., June 6, 2013 — Pulsed light technology provider Xenon Corp. has announced that three laboratories have joined its Printed Electronics Test Center Network, bringing the total of participating labs to 25 worldwide.

The network is a consortium of manufacturers, integrators and universities formed last year by Xenon to make equipment, resources and technologies for printed electronics (PE) available at lower cost to product developers and researchers. Participating labs are provided access to Xenon’s Sinteron sintering systems.

The new labs are: Texmac Inc. of Charlotte, N.C., a subsidiary of Itochu Corp. and a provider of solutions for the photovoltaic, printed circuit board and screen printing industries; Ohio Gravure Technologies Inc. of Miamisburg, a precision equipment and software developer; and California Polytechnic (Cal Poly) State University of San Luis Obispo, where research and classwork are being conducted on the application of solution-based inks on flexible substrates to produce functional devices for smart packaging, anticounterfeit protection, sensors, lighting and devices for energy harvesting and storage.

“The goals of the PE Test Center Network align very well with our areas of interest at Cal Poly,” said Dr. Xiaoying Rong, associate professor of graphic communication. “We believe high-speed, low-cost printing of functional circuits is an important area of research as well as a career path for our students.”

Commercial products have begun to emerge from the network, with two applications in the process of starting production, said Xenon CEO Lou Panico.

Product developers and researchers, as well as potential lab partners, who want to know more about the program should email Laurie Panico at

For more information, visit:

A rare gas used in small high-pressure arc lamps to produce a high-intensity source of light closely resembling the color quality of daylight.
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