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  • Trending Now in Biophotonics

BioPhotonics
Dec 2013
Karen A. Newman, Group Publisher, karen.newman@photonics.com

The biophotonics community has once again delivered a fascinating year of research findings and applications achievements in the life sciences, and as 2013 draws to a close, we set our editorial team to the task of revealing just what today’s headlines mean for the year ahead.

Contributing Editor Marie Freebody shares current trends in imaging in her feature, “Whole-Animal Imaging for Preclinical Research,” found on page 23. Optical imaging of small animals has grown up, with improved clarity, resolution and sensitivity when imaging at even greater depth. Among the trends to watch in whole-animal imaging are 3-D reconstructive multimodal imaging, a shift from bioluminescence imaging toward fluorescence imaging, deeper imaging penetration with red and near-IR wavelengths, and novel probes that hold promise of diagnosis and therapy in one tool.

IR, UV-VIS Techniques Are Safe, Speedy and Skin-Deep,” writes science writer Valerie C. Coffey in her feature on trends in spectroscopy, beginning on page 26. Advances across the full spectrum hold promise for biomedical applications, and near-IR spectroscopy may one day improve accuracy in both clinical research and pathological diagnosis.

In her feature, “A Big Market, Focused on the Very Small,” Managing Editor Laura S. Marshall brings microscopy trends into focus. Brain imaging has been getting a lot of attention lately, and microscopy advances are a big part of the story. Marshall polled a panel of industry experts for a look at the microscopy market today, and at where the technology appears to be headed. The feature starts on page 29.

News Editor Gary Boas takes a look at trends in lasers for his feature, “Burgeoning Uses Offer Growth Opportunities,” starting on page 32. Medical tourism, where patients seek health care outside their own country or region, whether to reduce costs or to find better care than they could at home, is booming, Boas found. Laser-based procedures are playing a major role both in general health care and in the medical tourism market’s expected growth.

We hope to see you at SPIE BiOS and Photonics West, coming up in early February. In the meantime, enjoy the issue.


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