Close

Search

Search Menu
Photonics Media Photonics Buyers' Guide Photonics EDU Photonics Spectra BioPhotonics EuroPhotonics Industrial Photonics Photonics Showcase Photonics ProdSpec Photonics Handbook
More News
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
2016 Photonics Buyers' Guide Clearance! – Use Coupon Code FC16 to save 60%!
share
Email Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Comments

UbiQD Awarded NSF Small Business Grant

Photonics.com
Aug 2016
LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 4, 2016 — Quantum dot (QD) manufacturer UbiQD LLC has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I grant by the National Science Foundation.

The 12-month, $225,000 award is intended to help fund the R&D of luminescent solar concentrating glass windows with QD coatings. In July, the company expanded its license to include the proof-of- concept work on the technology, originally developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in collaboration with Italy’s University of Milano-Bicocca.

N.M.-based quantum dot developer UbiQD was awarded a SBIR Phase I grant by the National Science Foundation.
New Mexico-based quantum dot developer UbiQD was awarded a SBIR Phase I grant by the National Science Foundation. Courtesy of UbiQD.

“It’s a privilege to receive an SBIR award through the National Science Foundation because it enables us to accelerate our growth and focus on a particularly large market opportunity for our low-hazard, low-cost quantum dot technology,” said Hunter McDaniel, founder and president of UbiQD. “Our vision is to turn ubiquitous, everyday windows into sunlight harvesters. Think of skyscrapers that power cities.”

U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich of New Mexico remarked that the award is an example of how technology developed at national laboratories can spur industry and create jobs within the state, adding that New Mexico, with its abundant solar resources, could be at the epicenter of the country’s clean energy economy.

UbiQD manufactures low-hazard QDs and nanocomposites.


GLOSSARY
quantum dots
Also known as QDs. Nanocrystals of semiconductor materials that fluoresce when excited by external light sources, primarily in narrow visible and near-infrared regions; they are commonly used as alternatives to organic dyes.  
Comments
Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy About Us Contact Us
back to top

Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS
©2016 Photonics Media
x We deliver – right to your inbox. Subscribe FREE to our newsletters.