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MonoVista and TriVista CRS

Photonics.com
Nov 2006
Princeton InstrumentsRequest Info
 
TRENTON, N.J., Nov. 1, 2006 -- Spectroscopy systems maker Princeton Instruments/Acton (PI/Acton) has released a new line of Raman spectrometers, the MonoVista CRS and TriVista CRS confocal Raman systems.

According to the company, the systems allow users to maximize the return on their investment by providing the ability to perform other spectroscopic techniques, such as photoluminescence, on a wide variety of samples. Systems are tailored to the customer’s requirements and budget, resulting in a flexible, upgradeable instrument. The system provides structural information for a wide variety of samples under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, either on a microscale level or from a bulk sample.
 
Due to the unique flexible design the systems are completely upgradeable, allowing the user's system to grow with his or her needs, the company said.

PIActonRaman.jpg“PI/Acton have utilized our core areas of expertise in high-end scientific cameras, spectrographs and optics, along with over 40 years of experience in the Raman market to bring scientists a series of confocal Raman systems that offer high performance, flexibility and value for money. These systems will appeal to researchers in every discipline with an interest in deriving more structural information from their samples,” said Antoinette O’Grady, business manager, spectroscopy.

The MonoVista CRS and TriVista CRS systems offer both macro and confocal microanalysis capabilities in a single system, enhancing experimental flexibility and allowing easy switching between macro and micro modes. Integration with Olympus upright and inverted microscopes provides spectroscopic data with diffraction limited spatially resolved accuracy. The completely integrated modular systems also provide instant results and easy configuration for multiple applications, PI/Acton said.

Integrated laser options are available and the systems can also be integrated with single or multiple existing laser systems, allowing use of different excitation wavelengths. High-stability base plates provide stability for vibration sensitive experiments. These versatile systems offer the widest range of detector options available, allowing customers to maximize their signal acquisition using CCDs, PMTs and InGaAs arrays, the company said. 

For more information, visit: www.piacton.com; e-mail: moreinfo@piacton.com

Princeton Instruments/Acton
3660 Quakerbridge Rd.
Trenton, NJ 08619
Phone: (609) 587-9797
Toll-free: (877) 4-PIACTON
Fax: (609) 587-1970



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GLOSSARY
camera
A light-tight box that receives light from an object or scene and focuses it to form an image on a light-sensitive material or a detector. The camera generally contains a lens of variable aperture and a shutter of variable speed to precisely control the exposure. In an electronic imaging system, the camera does not use chemical means to store the image, but takes advantage of the sensitivity of various detectors to different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. These sensors are transducers...
microscope
An instrument consisting essentially of a tube 160 mm long, with an objective lens at the distant end and an eyepiece at the near end. The objective forms a real aerial image of the object in the focal plane of the eyepiece where it is observed by the eye. The overall magnifying power is equal to the linear magnification of the objective multiplied by the magnifying power of the eyepiece. The eyepiece can be replaced by a film to photograph the primary image, or a positive or negative relay...
photonics
The technology of generating and harnessing light and other forms of radiant energy whose quantum unit is the photon. The science includes light emission, transmission, deflection, amplification and detection by optical components and instruments, lasers and other light sources, fiber optics, electro-optical instrumentation, related hardware and electronics, and sophisticated systems. The range of applications of photonics extends from energy generation to detection to communications and...
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