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  • Compact Snapshot SWIR Camera
May 2007
Sensors Unlimited - UTC Aerospace SystemsRequest Info
PRINCETON, N.J., MAY 15, 2007 -- SUI (Sensors Unlimited Inc.), a supplier of shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging systems based on indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) technology, has released the new SU320KTS line of snapshot video cameras.

SUI.jpgThe SU320KTS-1.7RT InGaAs SWIR camera provides high response from 0.9 to 1.7 µm, and the analogous SU320KTSVis-1.7RT Visible-InGaAs SWIR camera features extended wavelength response into the visible from 0.4 to 1.7 µm, said SUI, which is part of Goodrich Corp. The cameras' snapshot feature provides image capture from pulsed events or moving objects within one frame. It provides a low-cost alternative to the recently released SU640KTSX-1.7RT.

Low power (less than 2 W) and lightweight (OEM modules are less than 90 g and camera bodies less than 270 g), the cameras are ideal for system integration in machine vision, environmental, industrial and military imaging applications, the company said. The all-solid-state video cameras are available with a 320 x 256 pixel format on a 25-µm pitch, advanced automatic gain control, image enhancement and built-in non-uniformity corrections (NUCs). A variety of camera configurations are integrated in the camera, allowing for diverse applications that may require either corrected modes with variable integration time and constant gain, or variable gain and constant integration time.

The camera provides simultaneous 12-bit Camera Link digital and EIA-170 analog outputs, making the SU320KTS and SU320KTSVis cameras highly suited for pulsed laser-beam profiling and hyperspectral imaging, SUI said. Other applications include machine vision of moving objects and thermal imaging through standard glass optics at temperatures above 150 °C.

For more information, visit:; e-mail:

SUI (Sensors Unlimited Inc.)
3490 Route 1
Building 12
Princeton, N.J. 08540
Phone: (609) 520-0610
Fax: (609) 520-0638


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A light-tight box that receives light from an object or scene and focuses it to form an image on a light-sensitive material or a detector. The camera generally contains a lens of variable aperture and a shutter of variable speed to precisely control the exposure. In an electronic imaging system, the camera does not use chemical means to store the image, but takes advantage of the sensitivity of various detectors to different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. These sensors are transducers...
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