Close

Search

Search Menu
Photonics Media Photonics Buyers' Guide Photonics EDU Photonics Spectra BioPhotonics EuroPhotonics Industrial Photonics Photonics Showcase Photonics ProdSpec Photonics Handbook
More News
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
2016 Photonics Buyers' Guide Clearance! – Use Coupon Code FC16 to save 60%!
share
Email Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn

Talisker Fiber Laser

Photonics.com
May 2008
Coherent Inc.Request Info
 
SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 14, 2008 -- Coherent Inc. said the new Talisker combines the advantages of fiber-based and free-space lasers in a rugged industrial package that offers high power, picosecond output.

With over 18 W of average power at a pulse repetition rate of 200 kHz (pulsewidth < 15 ps), the Talisker will enable precision micromachining at high throughput rates with a negligible HAZ (heat-affected zone). And, with a choice of infrared (1064 nm), visible (532 nm) or ultraviolet (355 nm) output, Talisker can be used on virtually any material type, including metals, polymers, glass and semiconductors, the company said.

Talisker.jpgTalisker is also configured to facilitate integration and for ease of use, as its internal Web server simplifies remote diagnostics and preventative maintenance, Coherent said, and the compact laser head measures only 17 x 39 x 77 cm.

Talisker is a mode-locked laser that combines the best of both fiber-based and free-space lasers while avoiding the inherent limitations of each, Coherent said. Talisker uses a fiber-based oscillator that ensures industrial-grade stability, together with a bulk amplifier that boosts peak powers to higher than 10 MW. In contrast, traditional fiber lasers are limited to peak powers that are orders of magnitude lower than this to avoid self-damage.

According to the company, Talisker is intended for micromachining applications in the microelectronics, biomedical, semiconductor and solar device industries. Specific applications include drilling high-quality holes in silicon and metals, direct write of flexible circuits/displays, scribing of flat panel displays/solar cells, micromilling, wafer dicing and metal surface treatments.

For more information, visit: www.coherent.com; e-mail: tech.sales@coherent.com

Coherent Inc.
5100 Patrick Henry Dr.
Santa Clara, CA 95054
Phone: (408) 764-4000
Fax: (408) 764-4800



REQUEST INFO ABOUT THIS PRODUCT

* Message:
(requirements, questions for supplier)
Your contact information
* First Name:
* Last Name:
* Email Address:
* Company:
Address:
Address 2:
City:
State/Province:
Postal Code:
* Country:
Phone #:
Fax #:

Register or login to auto-populate this form:
Login Register
* Required
GLOSSARY
glass
A noncrystalline, inorganic mixture of various metallic oxides fused by heating with glassifiers such as silica, or boric or phosphoric oxides. Common window or bottle glass is a mixture of soda, lime and sand, melted and cast, rolled or blown to shape. Most glasses are transparent in the visible spectrum and up to about 2.5 µm in the infrared, but some are opaque such as natural obsidian; these are, nevertheless, useful as mirror blanks. Traces of some elements such as cobalt, copper and...
photonics
The technology of generating and harnessing light and other forms of radiant energy whose quantum unit is the photon. The science includes light emission, transmission, deflection, amplification and detection by optical components and instruments, lasers and other light sources, fiber optics, electro-optical instrumentation, related hardware and electronics, and sophisticated systems. The range of applications of photonics extends from energy generation to detection to communications and...
polymer
A material whose molecular structure consists of long chains made up by the repetition of many (usually thousands) of similar groups of atoms.
wafer
A cross-sectional slice cut from an ingot of either single-crystal, fused, polycrystalline or amorphous material that has refined surfaces either lapped or polished. Wafers are used either as substrates for electronic device manufacturing or as optics. Typically, they are made of silicon, quartz, gallium arsenide or indium phosphide.
Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy About Us Contact Us
back to top

Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS
©2016 Photonics Media
x We deliver – right to your inbox. Subscribe FREE to our newsletters.