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  • Large Fiber Collimator

Photonics Showcase
Jul 2010
Micro Laser Systems Inc.Request Info
The FC40 is a new addition to the Fiber Collimator family that produces a large 23-mm-diameter beam measured at the 1/e2 points. The body is made of stainless steel with adjustable focus that translates without rotation. Unique optical design generates a diffraction-limited Gaussian beam at any distance. We also have smaller collimators and routinely design custom collimators. Wavelengths covered are from 370 to 2100 nm.


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1. A bundle of light rays that may be parallel, converging or diverging. 2. A concentrated, unidirectional stream of particles. 3. A concentrated, unidirectional flow of electromagnetic waves.
An optical instrument consisting of a well- corrected objective lens or mirror with a light source and or object/image (i.e. illuminated slit or retical) at its focal plane. Collimators are used to calibrate and align optical devices and elements, determine focal lengths, as well as replicate and project an source/object or image to infinity.  
1. The focal point. 2. To adjust the eyepiece or objective of a telescope so that the image is clearly seen by the observer. 3. To adjust the camera lens, plate, or film holder so that the image is rendered distinct. 4. To move an entire microscope body tube relative to a specimen to obtain the sharpest possible image.
Gaussian beam
A beam of light whose electrical field amplitude distribution is Gaussian. When such a beam is circular in cross section, the amplitude is E(r) = E(0) exp [-(r/w)2], where r is the distance from beam center and w is the radius at which the amplitude is 1/e of its value on the axis; w is called the beamwidth.
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