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Camera System

Photonics Spectra
Sep 2010
PCO-TECH Inc.Request Info
 
The Cooke Corp. has introduced pco.edge, a camera system that performs high-fidelity scientific imaging. Based on a scientific CMOS image sensor, it delivers low noise, fast frame rates, a wide dynamic range, high quantum efficiency, high resolution and a large field of view, simultaneously and all in one image. The camera offers low readout noise of 1.4 e rms. Even at the maximum speed of 100 fps at full resolution of 2560 x 2160 pixels (5.5 megapixels, 21.8-mm diagonal, 6.5-μm pixels), the readout noise is <2 e. Applications include live-cell microscopy, particle imaging velocimetry, single-molecule detection, superresolution microscopy, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy/waveguides, adaptive optics, solar astronomy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photovoltaic inspection, x-ray tomography, machine vision, spectral and hyperspectral imaging, and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.


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GLOSSARY
adaptive optics
Optical components or assemblies whose performance is monitored and controlled so as to compensate for aberrations, static or dynamic perturbations such as thermal, mechanical and acoustical disturbances, or to adapt to changing conditions, needs or missions. The most familiar example is the "rubber mirror,'' whose surface shape, and thus reflective qualities, can be controlled by electromechanical means. See also active optics; phase conjugation.
astronomy
The scientific observation of celestial radiation that has reached the vicinity of Earth, and the interpretation of these observations to determine the characteristics of the extraterrestrial bodies and phenomena that have emitted the radiation.
camera
A light-tight box that receives light from an object or scene and focuses it to form an image on a light-sensitive material or a detector. The camera generally contains a lens of variable aperture and a shutter of variable speed to precisely control the exposure. In an electronic imaging system, the camera does not use chemical means to store the image, but takes advantage of the sensitivity of various detectors to different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. These sensors are transducers...
fluorescence
The emission of light or other electromagnetic radiation of longer wavelengths by a substance as a result of the absorption of some other radiation of shorter wavelengths, provided the emission continues only as long as the stimulus producing it is maintained. In other words, fluorescence is the luminescence that persists for less than about 10-8 s after excitation.
fluorescence spectroscopy
The spectroscopic study of radiation emitted by the process of fluorescence.
hyperspectral imaging
Methods for identifying and mapping materials through spectroscopic remote sensing. Also called imaging spectroscopy; ultraspectral imaging.
image
In optics, an image is the reconstruction of light rays from a source or object when light from that source or object is passed through a system of optics and onto an image forming plane. Light rays passing through an optical system tend to either converge (real image) or diverge (virtual image) to a plane (also called the image plane) in which a visual reproduction of the object is formed. This reconstructed pictorial representation of the object is called an image.
resolution
1. In optics, the ability of a lens system to reproduce the points, lines and surfaces in an object as separate entities in the image. 2. The minimum adjustment increment effectively achievable by a positioning mechanism. 3. In image processing, the accuracy with which brightness, spatial parameters and frame rate are divided into discrete levels.
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