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  • IR-Enhanced CCD Image Sensors
Nov 2010
Hamamatsu Photonics UK Ltd.Request Info
WELWYN GARDEN CITY, England, Nov. 16, 2010 — Hamamatsu Photonics UK Ltd. has introduced the S11510 series full frame transfer CCD (FFT-CCD) image sensors with ultrahigh sensitivity in the near-IR region. Using proprietary technology in laser processing, it is possible to form a microelectromechanical systems structure on the back side of the CCD, which results in a much higher sensitivity at wavelengths longer than 800 nm.

The sensors feature quantum efficiency of 40% at 1000 nm, without the need for a deep depletion structure, with its corresponding drawback of higher dark signal. They are available with 1024 or 2048 pixels, with each pixel measuring 14 × 14 µm.

In addition to high IR sensitivity, the devices can be used with a long active area in the sensor height direction. This can be achieved via binning, making them suitable for Raman spectroscopy. They also feature low etalation, which is often a problem in Raman applications, where smooth and stable output is important.

The S11510 series is similar in design to the conventional S10420-01 FFT-CCD, and the two are pin-compatible, allowing for operation under the same drive conditions. This makes for a simple way to improve the near-IR sensitivity of an existing image sensor or spectrometer.


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Combining adjacent pixels into one larger pixel, resulting in increased sensitivity and lower resolution, or, in image analysis, excluding objects based on shape, position or area.
Raman spectroscopy
That branch of spectroscopy concerned with Raman spectra and used to provide a means of studying pure rotational, pure vibrational and rotation-vibration energy changes in the ground level of molecules. Raman spectroscopy is dependent on the collision of incident light quanta with the molecule, inducing the molecule to undergo the change.  
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