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Raman Filters

Photonics Spectra
Jan 2011
OptiGrate Corp.Request Info
 
OptiGrate Corp. has unveiled a line of ultranarrow notch and bandpass filters for Raman spectroscopy applications. The filters have a bandwidth of <10 cm—1, which the company says is about 10 times narrower than other notch and bandpass filters commercially available for these applications. The filters enable measurements of ultralow-frequency Raman bands with standard instruments, rather than with the previous complex, bulky and more expensive tools. Applications include nanotechnology, pharmacology and semiconductor processing. Using a single-stage spectrometer, Stokes and anti-Stokes frequencies can be measured down to 4.5 cm—1 with a set of BragGrate filters. The filters are based on reflecting volume Bragg gratings formed in proprietary photosensitive glass material, and they are available for a wide range of Raman laser source wavelengths, including 488, 514, 532, 633, 785 and 1064 nm.


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GLOSSARY
nanotechnology
The use of atoms, molecules and molecular-scale structures to enhance existing technology and develop new materials and devices. The goal of this technology is to manipulate atomic and molecular particles to create devices that are thousands of times smaller and faster than those of the current microtechnologies.
Raman spectroscopy
That branch of spectroscopy concerned with Raman spectra and used to provide a means of studying pure rotational, pure vibrational and rotation-vibration energy changes in the ground level of molecules. Raman spectroscopy is dependent on the collision of incident light quanta with the molecule, inducing the molecule to undergo the change.  
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