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Fast Axial OEM Sensor

Photonics.com
Nov 2012
Ophir - Spiricon LLC, PhotonicsRequest Info
 
NORTH LOGAN, Utah, Nov. 14, 2012 — Ophir Photonics Group has announced a fast axial OEM sensor based on a thermopile design that provides fast response times and high power levels. Response times are up to 20 times that of traditional thermopile sensors; power and energy levels are up to 2000 J for single pulses and >20-kW average power. The device accommodates laser beam sizes from 20 mm to 180 × 180 mm.

The sensor operates on the principle of axial heat flow in the direction of incident laser or light beams. This is instead of the usual radial sensor, where heat flows from the center outward. In the axial sensor, heat flows through a thermopile deposited as a thin layer on the surface of the heat sink. Heat flows only a small distance axially into the substrate, resulting in improvements in response times and support for higher power levels.

The sensor is available for any type and wavelength of laser and for any power or configuration. It reaches 10% to 90% response time in 50 ms.

High-speed, small-aperture versions can be used as internal monitors of high-power industrial lasers, and the fast response time means better control of laser power. The smaller version can measure up to 150 W.


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GLOSSARY
heat sink
A series of flanges or other conducting surfaces, usually metal, attached to an electronic device to transmit and dissipate heat that might damage internal circuitry.
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