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MicroSpec Microscope Interface

Photonics.com
Feb 2013
Princeton InstrumentsRequest Info
 
TRENTON, N.J., Feb. 13, 2013 — Princeton Instruments is offering a microscope interface designed for exclusive use with the company’s aberration-free IsoPlane imaging spectrograph. The MicroSpec microscope interface allows researchers to easily acquire quality images and spectra of their samples with one pre-engineered system.

It attaches to a UDP port on select Olympus, Nikon and Zeiss inverted microscopes. The interface is not compatible with any other spectrographs, nor with upright microscopes. It supports all of the company’s cameras with a spectroscopy mount and without an internal shutter, and captures images with up to a 12 × 12-mm field of view.

The IsoPlane SCT 320 spectrograph provides high-quality imaging and spectra across the focal plane due to zero astigmatism and negligible spherical aberration and coma. The lack of aberrations also means more photons hit fewer pixels, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio of spectra.

When coupled to a microscope, the IsoPlane can resolve up to 25 line pairs per millimeter, the Nyquist limit of CCD cameras with 20-μm pixels. It can be used from the vacuum-UV to the mid-IR, with software-controlled scanning and an interchangeable triple grating turret. It also supports the proprietary IntelliCal state-of-the-art wavelength and intensity calibration package.

Applications of the MicroSpec-IsoPlane system include fluorescence, Raman, photoluminescence, single-molecule spectroscopy, quantum dots, live-cell imaging, and carbon nanotube short-wavelength infrared imaging and sum frequency generation.


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GLOSSARY
astigmatism
A lens aberration that results in the tangential and sagittal image planes being separated axially.  
coma
A lens aberration, resulting from different magnifications in the various lens zones, that occurs in that part of the image field that is some distance from the principal axis of the system. Extra-axial object points appear as short cometlike images with the brighter small head toward the center of the field (positive coma) or away from the center (negative coma).  
fluorescence
The emission of light or other electromagnetic radiation of longer wavelengths by a substance as a result of the absorption of some other radiation of shorter wavelengths, provided the emission continues only as long as the stimulus producing it is maintained. In other words, fluorescence is the luminescence that persists for less than about 10-8 s after excitation.
quantum dots
Also known as QDs. Nanocrystals of semiconductor materials that fluoresce when excited by external light sources, primarily in narrow visible and near-infrared regions; they are commonly used as alternatives to organic dyes.  
spectrograph
An optical instrument for forming the spectrum of a light source and recording it on a film. The dispersing medium may be a prism or a diffraction grating. A concave grating requires no other means to form a sharp image of the slit on the film, but a plane grating or a prism requires auxiliary lenses or concave mirrors to act as image-forming means in addition to the dispersing element. Refracting prisms can be used only in parallel light, so a collimating lens is required before the prism and...
spherical aberration
That basic aberration which leads to the failure of a lens to form a perfect image of a monochromatic, on-axis point source object. Aspheric surfaces may be applied to reduce this defect. When rays from a point on the axis passing through the outer lens zones are focused closer to the lens than rays passing the central zones, the lens is said to have negative spherical aberration; if the outer zones have a longer focal length than the inner zones, the lens is said to have positive spherical...
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