Search
Menu

High-Speed Photoacoustic Microscopy Captures Processes Within Tissue

Facebook X LinkedIn Email
Enabled by innovative imaging mechanisms, fast scanning technologies, and high throughput, the microscopy technique can be used to image tissues that are sensitive to dynamic changes.

JUNJIE YAO AND VAN TU NGUYEN, DUKE UNIVERSITY

When Alexander Graham Bell discovered the photoacoustic effect in the 1880s, he might not have envisioned that this technology would ultimately be successfully implemented in biomedical imaging applications such as neuroscience, dermatology, and cancer biology. In the photoacoustic effect, the excitation light is absorbed by molecules in a sample, and the absorbed photon energy slightly elevates the local temperature via nonradiative relaxation, which eventually induces a pressure wave propagating as ultrasound (Figure 1a). Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) images of glass frog...Read full article

Related content from Photonics Media



    Articles


    Products


    Photonics Handbook Articles


    White Papers


    Webinars


    Photonics Dictionary Terms


    Media


    Photonics Buyers' Guide Categories


    Companies
    Published: March 2023
    FeaturesPhotoacoustic Microscopynonradiative relaxationultrasoundPhotoacoustic tomographySeno Medical Instrumentsphotoacoustic computed tomographyOR-PAMAR-PAMMEMS scanning mirrorsblood oxygenationhemodynamicsmelanomaneuroscienceMicroscopy

    We use cookies to improve user experience and analyze our website traffic as stated in our Privacy Policy. By using this website, you agree to the use of cookies unless you have disabled them.