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Near-Field Raman Offers 25-nm Resolution

Photonics Spectra
Apr 2003
Researchers at the University of Rochester in New York, Portland State University in Oregon and Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., have reported a spatial resolution of 25 nm in their study of the near-field Raman imaging of single-walled carbon nanotubes. They presented the findings of their experiments in the March 7 issue of Physical Review Letters.

Near-Field Raman Offers 25-nm Resolution

Their setup featured 20- to 30-nm-diameter silver probes and 633-nm laser illumination with a 1.4-NA inverted optical microscope. The scientists produced near-field Raman images (above) of two samples of nanotubes and demonstrated that it is possible to resolve the spectra of 5-nm-high Ni/Y catalyst particles separated by 35 nm in the 1.7-nm-diameter tubes.

They have since achieved 17-nm resolution with the technique.

GLOSSARY
single-walled carbon nanotubes
Referred to as SWCNTs, these cylindrical nanostructures composed of a folded sheet of graphene can be used as near-infrared markers for small animal multiplex imaging. Emitting at different wavelengths, which can be tuned in the visible or NIR region, SWNCTs provide photostable, narrow bandwidth fluorescence in a wide chromatic variety. That enables simultaneous imaging of a large number of spectrally separated markers, through the use of global hyperspectral imaging. In addition to being used...
Microscopynear-field Raman imagingResearch & Technologysingle-walled carbon nanotubesspatial resolution of 25 nmTech Pulse

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