Close

Search

Search Menu
Photonics Media Photonics Buyers' Guide Photonics EDU Photonics Spectra BioPhotonics EuroPhotonics Industrial Photonics Photonics Showcase Photonics ProdSpec Photonics Handbook
More News
share
Email Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Comments

New Technique Boosts Photovoltage for Perovskite Solar Cells

Photonics.com
Jul 2018
GUILDFORD, England, July 2, 2018 — A technique for producing high-performance inverted perovskite solar cells, called solution-process secondary growth (SSG), was shown to increase the voltage of inverted perovskite solar cells by as much as 1.21 V.

Inverted planar perovskite solar cells can simplify device structure and reduce costs, compared with conventional solar cells. However, lower open-circuit voltages in perovskite cells can result in lower power-conversion efficiencies (PCEs) than in conventional cells.

The SSG technique reduces nonradiative charge-carrier recombination — a process whereby energy and efficiency are lost in perovskite cells. SSG was used to produce a wider bandgap top layer and a more n-type perovskite film, mitigating nonradiative recombination and leading to an increase in open-circuit voltages of 100 mV. These performance improvements do not compromise the quality of the solar cell or the electrical current flowing through a device, researchers said.

The team of researchers from Peking University and the universities of Surrey, Oxford, and Cambridge tested the technique on a device that recorded a PCE of 20.9 percent. According to the team, this is the highest certified PCE for inverted perovskite solar cells ever recorded.

“Our new technique confirms that there is a lot of promise with perovskite solar cells, and we aim to explore this new and exciting area more in the future,” said researcher Wei Zhang from the University of Surrey.

The research was published in Science (doi:10.1126/science.aap9282).

GLOSSARY
solar cell
A device for converting sunlight into electrical energy, consisting of a sandwich of P-type and N-type semiconducting wafers. A photon with sufficient energy striking the cell can dislodge an electron from an atom near the interface of the two crystal types. Electrons released in this way, collected at an electrode, can constitute an electrical current.
Research & TechnologyeducationEuropeAsia-Pacificlight sourcesmaterialsphotovoltaicsenergyperovskitesolarsolar cellUniversity of Surrey

Comments
Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy About Us Contact Us
back to top

Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS
©2018 Photonics Media, 100 West St., Pittsfield, MA, 01201 USA, info@photonics.com
x We deliver – right to your inbox. Subscribe FREE to our newsletters.
We use cookies to improve user experience and analyze our website traffic as stated in our Privacy Policy. By using this website, you agree to the use of cookies unless you have disabled them.