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Konarka, Evident Collaborate

Photonics.com
Mar 2005
LOWELL, Mass. and TROY, N.Y., March 23 -- Konarka Technologies Inc., a Lowell, Mass., maker of light-activated power plastics, and Evident Technologies, a quantum dot developer based in Troy, N.Y., are collaborating on research to increase the sensitivity of plastic solar cells to a wider range of the light spectrum. The team is developing materials to improve the overall performance of power plastic.

Konarka is producing flexible, lightweight and versatile power plastic that makes it possible for devices, systems and structures to have low-cost embedded sources of renewable power.

Evident's EviDots, which are high-performance semiconductor nanocrystals active throughout the visible spectrum and into the near-infrared, are being combined with Konarka's conductive polymers to create ultrahigh-performance solar cells.

The companies said quantum dot power plastic could be used for energy, communications and military applications, such as battlefield or off-grid power generation.

"As part of our continuing efforts to push photovoltaic science forward, we've learned how to get sensitivity outside the visible light spectrum, including the infrared, with our polymers," said Russell Gaudiana, PhD, vice president of research and development at Konarka. "This collaboration is focused on determining the best materials to capture more light and how to manufacture them outside the lab environment."

For more information, visit: www.evidenttech.com



GLOSSARY
quantum dots
Also known as QDs. Nanocrystals of semiconductor materials that fluoresce when excited by external light sources, primarily in narrow visible and near-infrared regions; they are commonly used as alternatives to organic dyes.  
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