Search Menu
Photonics Media Photonics Buyers' Guide Photonics EDU Photonics Spectra BioPhotonics EuroPhotonics Industrial Photonics Photonics Showcase Photonics ProdSpec Photonics Handbook
More News
Email Facebook Twitter Google+ LinkedIn Comments

  • AOptix Awarded $11M in DARPA Contracts
Dec 2010
CAMPBELL, Calif., Dec. 20, 2010 — Privately funded AOptix Technologies Inc. announced it received an $11.4 million contract to deliver wireless air and ground optical terminals for DARPA’s Free Space Optical Experimental Network Experiment program.

Under subcontract to Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, the company will build and flight-validate its free space optical (FSO) terminals at up to 10 Gbps and 200 km on various aircraft and static ground stations.

The goal of the program is to field test high-bandwidth communication systems, by integrating FSO and radio frequency (RF) technology into a full mesh network. Designed to exploit the high capacity and long range of FSO, the hybrid systems relieve the congestion of RF networks and enable data transmission under extreme environmental conditions. The communication system will provide the capability to relay and downlink high volume ISR data traffic in real-time.

“This program will build on years of successful flight test programs where AOptix has delivered a number of firsts in bandwidth and distance for FSO communications,” said Dean Senner, president and CEO of AOptix. “We’re working very hard with our partners to deploy ultrahigh bandwidth solutions, bringing on-line, real-time, sensor data communications capabilities to enable warfighter operations.”

The wireless bi-directional optical terminals uses a patented, single aperture, adaptive optics method of beam control to compensate for real-time atmospheric turbulence, while still maintaining lock between two terminals.

AOptix develops FSO communications and iris biometrics based identification solutions for government and commercial markets.

For more information, visit: 

adaptive optics
Optical components or assemblies whose performance is monitored and controlled so as to compensate for aberrations, static or dynamic perturbations such as thermal, mechanical and acoustical disturbances, or to adapt to changing conditions, needs or missions. The most familiar example is the "rubber mirror,'' whose surface shape, and thus reflective qualities, can be controlled by electromechanical means. See also active optics; phase conjugation.
An opening or hole through which radiation or matter may pass.
atmospheric turbulence
Irregularities and disturbances in the atmosphere that are of particular interest because they induce random temporal and spatial phase and amplitude fluctuations that destroy the optical quality and the coherence properties of laser beams.
The technology devoted to the analysis of unique biological characteristics such as voice patterns and fingerprint, retina, iris, and hand and face geometry to determine or authenticate the identity of an individual.
Pertaining to optics and the phenomena of light.
Terms & Conditions Privacy Policy About Us Contact Us
back to top

Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS
©2016 Photonics Media
x We deliver – right to your inbox. Subscribe FREE to our newsletters.