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NanoVue 248nm, 4X DUV Zoom Lens

Photonics.com
Oct 2006
Navitar Inc.Request Info
 
ROCHESTER, N.Y., Oct. 25, 2006 -- Over the years, feature sizes on semiconductor wafers, data storage devices and microelectronic components have continued to shrink well below the wavelength of visible light. Navitar has responded to this increasing need to further extend resolution limits for optical inspection with the NanoVue 248 nm 4X deep UV zoom lens.

The NanoVue optical system works in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) light, enabling detection and characterization of yield-critical defects while effectively doubling the resolution limit of conventional visible light microscopes, the company said. Navitar supplies optics, optomechanical subassemblies and opto-electronic system solutions to the machine vision, automation, assembly, imaging, testing, measuring and inspection industries.

NavitarDUVZoom.jpgThe NanoVue zoom lens is ideal for OEM new product development and integration into DUV instruments requiring higher throughput, the company said. The lens is designed to work with 248-nm DUV infinity-corrected microscope objectives to enable optical inspection to under 0.1 µm and has a zoom range of 0.75X to 3X. When using the 100X objective corrected at 200-mm tube length, a zoom range of 75X to 300X is possible. The field of view (FOV) of 0.14 to 0.37 mm can be achieved when using a 100X infinity-corrected DUV objective with a 2/3 in. format sensor.

With 0.1 µm resolution, the NanoVue 248 nm 4X deep UV zoom is designed for the highest resolution applications, Navitar said. An optional motorized version makes the observation process and automation of critical image data acquisition even faster. According to Craig Fitzgerald, Navitar's vice president of North American sales, "The Navitar NanoVue 248 nm 4x zoom allows customers to quickly develop new, flexible automated instruments that are feature rich, lower in cost and have smaller footprints."

The NanoVue's small and flexible optical footprint enables a broad range of inspection and defect review tasks, including DUV reticle and photomask inspection, thin film measurement, wafer inspection, CD metrology, failure analysis and process control, the company said. Using the DUV zoom coupled with one objective, an instrument operator can zoom in on particular details of interest and achieve the exact FOV required while still resolving the important details.

For more information, visit: www.navitar.com; e-mail: info@navitar.com

Navitar Inc.
200 Commerce Dr.
Rochester, NY 14623
Phone: (585) 359-4000
Fax: (585) 359-4999



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GLOSSARY
lens
A transparent optical component consisting of one or more pieces of optical glass with surfaces so curved (usually spherical) that they serve to converge or diverge the transmitted rays from an object, thus forming a real or virtual image of that object.
microscope
An instrument consisting essentially of a tube 160 mm long, with an objective lens at the distant end and an eyepiece at the near end. The objective forms a real aerial image of the object in the focal plane of the eyepiece where it is observed by the eye. The overall magnifying power is equal to the linear magnification of the objective multiplied by the magnifying power of the eyepiece. The eyepiece can be replaced by a film to photograph the primary image, or a positive or negative relay...
optical
Pertaining to optics and the phenomena of light.
resolution
1. In optics, the ability of a lens system to reproduce the points, lines and surfaces in an object as separate entities in the image. 2. The minimum adjustment increment effectively achievable by a positioning mechanism. 3. In image processing, the accuracy with which brightness, spatial parameters and frame rate are divided into discrete levels.
zoom
To control, by magnifying or reducing, the size of a televised image, either electronically or optically.
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