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  • Life Sciences Interface

Oct 2010
Carl Zeiss AG, Camera LensesRequest Info
Carl Zeiss AG has introduced an integrated hardware/software interface to connect light and scanning electron microscopes for materials analysis and correlative microscopy in the life sciences. “Shuttle & Find” enables users to recall regions of interest in fixed specimens in an electron microscope, which were previously identified in a light microscope, and vice versa, in only a few seconds. This opens up new applications in microscopy: rapid and precise overlay of light and electron microscope images, high-resolution magnification of details, and the merger of functional and structural information. Features include a transferable specimen holder that enables smooth specimen transfer between the light and electron microscopes (shuttle) and a software module that controls all functions of light and electron microscopes that are required to identify and recall the defined region of interest (find).


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The ratio of the size of the image of an object to that of the object. The ratio of the linear size of the image to that of the object is lateral magnification. Angular magnification is the ratio of the apparent angular size of the image observed through an optical device to that of the object viewed by the unaided eye. Longitudinal magnification is the ratio of the longitudinal or axial dimension of an image to the corresponding dimension of the object.
An instrument consisting essentially of a tube 160 mm long, with an objective lens at the distant end and an eyepiece at the near end. The objective forms a real aerial image of the object in the focal plane of the eyepiece where it is observed by the eye. The overall magnifying power is equal to the linear magnification of the objective multiplied by the magnifying power of the eyepiece. The eyepiece can be replaced by a film to photograph the primary image, or a positive or negative relay...
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