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  • APL-X Series 10-W Air-Cooled Picosecond Lasers
Jan 2013
RPMC Lasers Inc.Request Info
O’FALLON, Mo., Jan. 16, 2013 — The APL-X series industrial picosecond lasers manufactured by Attodyne Inc. are available through RPMC Lasers Inc.

The air-cooled instruments provide up to 10 W of average power with <10-ps pulses and repetition rates from single-shot to 1 MHz. At 100 kHz, they will provide 100 μJ of pulse energy with up to 200 μJ available at lower repetition rates. Beam quality is M² <1.3.

They can be provided with harmonic wavelengths of 532 and 355 nm. The customer can choose either single-wavelength output or can have the unit configured to output multiple wavelengths to be dispersed through different output ports. The user can switch between the wavelengths via the remote serial port or front panel user interface.

The APL-X is equipped with pulse burst and packet modes for greater machining control and to increase the removal rate of some material.

The lasers are compact and also offer water cooling. The laser head measures 13.19 × 19.65 × 7.36 in., while the control module measures 15.74 × 15.74 × 7.4 in. The laser head and control module are connected by a detachable umbilical that can be provided at up to 10 m in length.

Applications include micromachining, wafer repair, thin-film transistor repair, microscopy, DNA analysis, machining of thin films, spectroscopy, marking, dicing, scribing, nonlinear optics and laser deposition.


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The process of perforating a silicon or ceramic substrate with a series of tiny holes along which it will break. Nd:YAG or CO2 lasers are now routinely used.
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