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Pixel Size & Sensitivity
Wednesday, October 17, 2012

The relationship between pixel size of an image sensor and its sensitivity is discussed in detail to illuminate the reality behind the myth that larger pixel image sensors are always more sensitive than small pixel sensors.

File: PCO_kb_pixel_size_sensitivity.pdf (1.66 MB)
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